Motorcyclist Dies after Colliding with Car in West Palm Beach

Jan 10, 2015 Posted by in Auto Accident, Motorcycle Accident

When a motorcycle collides with a larger vehicle such as a passenger car or an SUV, the motorcyclist often suffers severe or fatal injuries from the initial impact and the subsequent impacts. Automobile-motorcycle collisions are commonly the result of speeding, improper lane changes, failing to stop in time, failing to yield, and any dangerous driving maneuvers by either or both operators of the vehicles involved.

According to WPTV 5, on Dec. 23, a 32-year-old motorcyclist died when the Yamaha motorcycle he was riding was involved in a collision with a 2011 Dodge Avenger around 6 p.m. in the 2800 block of North Australian Avenue in West Palm Beach. The motorcyclist was pronounced dead at the scene. The 39-year-old female driver of the Dodge was not injured in the collision. The West Palm Beach Police are still investigating the fatal crash.

Motorcycles provide an enjoyable and economical mode of transportation for more than 600,000 Florida residents. However, motorcycles only make up a small percentage of all motor vehicles on Florida roads. This leaves motorcyclists facing a significant degree of risk as they travel the roadways along with so many larger vehicles. When a collision between a motorcycle and an automobile or any larger vehicle occurs, the riders almost always bears the brunt of the crash regardless of which party is at fault for the collision.

It’s not stated in this report how the collision occurred and which motorist was potentially at fault for the fatal collision. In many motorcycle accident cases, the driver fails to see the motorcyclist. But even if the rider contributed to his own injuries, he may still be entitled to compensation under Florida’s comparative negligence law.
This means that even if the rider traveled the road at high rates of speed, but it can be proven that the driver was distracted, failed to yield to the motorcycle, was driving too fast for the conditions or failed to see the motorcycle, both parties may share liability. If the victim’s family files a wrongful death suit against the driver, the court would determine the damages based on the degree of drivers negligence.

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